WALK THE LINE

in the fifties, the South was not a pleasant place. Racial inequality and brutal racist violence reigned, and the South was scarred by it, and this was the South Johnny Cash was touring in as he began to make his name, venturing out of Memphis, his big hit Walk The Line spreading his name.

As James and Bruce head away from their overnight stay, the trip becomes real mixed bag: some epic blues history, some unspeakable racist brutality, and a charming piece of country history.

Namely, Robert Johnson's grave, the place where Emmett Till came across Southern racism in all its horror, and the Tallahatchie Bridge, the setting for the beautiful Ode to Billie Joe by Bobby Gentry.

Road leading to Tallahatchie Bridge

The road leading up to the Tallahatchie Bridge, although the one from the time of the song is no longer there

View towards Money from the Tallahatchie Bridge

The Tallahatchie Bridge, looking towards Bryants Meat Market, where Emmett Till discovered the depths of Southern brutality

Church where Robert Johnson is buried

The entrance to the churchard where Robert Johnson is buried, following a night upsetting the beau of Craphouse Bea

Rober Johnson's grave

Robert Johnson's grave, under a pecan tree

Tallahatchie Bridge

The Tallahatchie Bridge

View from the Tallahatchie Bridge

The Tallahatchie Bridge - I'm sure that Billie Joe McAllister would do nothing more than turn an ankle

The church where Robert Johnson is buried

The church where Robert Johnson is buried

Robert Johnson's grave

Robert Johnson's grave, now with a gravestone